3D rendering of velocity anomalies

Lately I’ve been working on using the yt library (https://yt-project.org) for 3D visualization of seismic data sets. Seismologists generally avoid 3D plots in lieu of 2D slices of 3D data as it’s often hard to interpret 3D structure. Much of that difficultly comes from highlighting iso-surfaces, but yt is different in that it uses ray-tracing to project through a data set, integrating information as it goes. The result is a 3D rendering that maintains accumulated structure.

Here’s an example of a 3D rendering of negative velocity anomalies in the Western U.S. from 50-1200 km deep, using the shear wave data from James et al. 2011, one of the 3D datasets available via IRIS (https://ds.iris.edu/ds/products/emc-nwus11-s/):

The highlighted structures represent regions in the Earth’s mantle that exhibit slower seismic shear wave speeds when compared to a reference model and the faint grid in the middle of the model domain is at 410 km, the upper limit of the mantle transition zone. The white dot on the surface is Yellowstone.

This is a preliminary image, so I won’t dive into interpretation of the structure embedded here, so for now, just enjoy this mesmerizing GIF: